The Call For Session Proposals is Open 05/11/12

Countdown towards the 15th edition of the International Anti-Corruption Conference has begun!

It is time to plan your active participation at the world’s most innovative and dynamic forum for fighting corruption and boosting transparency. For a limited time only, we are inviting actors from civil society, the public and private sectors, journalists, activists, academics, students and young people from all around the world to submit proposals for up to 50 sessions that will take place this November in Brasilia.

It is time to plan your active participation at the world’s most innovative and dynamic forum for fighting corruption and boosting transparency. For a limited time only, we are inviting actors from civil society, the public and private sectors, journalists, activists, academics, students and young people from all around the world to submit proposals for up to 50 sessions that will take place this November in Brasilia.

Be quick! We ask that you submit your proposal here online by 31 May.

For further information please visit www.15iacc.org or click here

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Mobilising People: Connecting Agents of Change 09/21/11

The theme for the 15th IACC has been selected

Berlin / Brasilia, 28 September 2011 — With the theme, “Mobilising People: Connecting Agents of Change” the 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference series (15th IACC) will be held in Brasília, Brazil from 7 - 10 November 2012. Taking place since 1983, the IACC series is the leading independent global platform for those who want to put an end to corruption and eliminate its pervasive impact on governance, the economy, the environment and most importantly on people’s everyday lives, especially the most vulnerable.

Berlin / Brasilia, 28 September 2011 — With the theme, “Mobilising People: Connecting Agents of Change” the 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference series (15th IACC) will be held in Brasília, Brazil from 7 - 10 November 2012. Taking place since 1983, the IACC series is the leading independent global platform for those who want to put an end to corruption and eliminate its pervasive impact on governance, the economy, the environment and most importantly on people’s everyday lives, especially the most vulnerable.

Building a more dynamic movement for transparency
The 14th IACC held in Bangkok, Thailand in November 2010 pointed the way for the future of the fight against corruption: The international anti-corruption movement decided on a new emphasis on fighting corruption by empowering and mobilising people, be it from civil society, the private or public sectors, and younger generations. Achieving this needs innovation, fresh new ideas and most importantly, an open and vibrant interaction among all sectors.

Next year’s conference will support and connect people who want to change the rules of the game
People are devising new ways to push for greater transparency and accountability, and are standing up to ultimately achieve greater social justice. Yet corruption and impunity have an immense destabilising effect on society. Now more than ever, mutually accountable action is needed to create irreversible change, and to ensure that the power fuelled by corruption harms societies no more. It is people who will create this change.

Be part of the solution
Over 1,500 participants from over 135 countries are expected at the 15th IACC, drawing together people and leaders from the public and private sectors, young and investigate journalists, the judiciary, law enforcement, activists, academia, media, and civil society. Join the 15th IACC in producing strategies and recommendations to reshape the global governance agenda for a fair and sustainable future.


For further information please visit the conference website at: http://www.15iacc.org or write to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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IACC Newsletter Interview with Cobus de Swardt 09/21/11

Interview with Transparency International's Managing Director

On the occasion of the global announcement of our theme and venue for the 15th IACC we had the pleasure to talk to Cobus de Swardt. Cobus is Managing Director of Transparency International. In this interview he shares his thoughts on the chosen theme as well as on the IACC’s role in the fight against corruption. 

IACC team: The theme of the 15th IACC has been selected. Next year the conference will evolve around the theme Mobilising People: Connecting Agents of Change.  What does this theme mean to you?

Cobus de Swardt: I think if you look at the key phrasing – mobilising people – for civil society this is a key action and arguably at this time the weakest link of our actions to fight corruption. Historically civil society has fought corruption by doing three things:

Firstly by putting a lot of political pressure at the top for change – we have been very good at that. Secondly we had and continue to have programmes that we run in key areas where we want to have a domino effect where we want to bring about systematic change – we have been quite good at that. The third pillar, namely pressure from bottom-up, arguably over the years has been the one where we have been the weakest at. Over the last couple of years we have seen both – the efforts within the anti-corruption movement, as well as from citizens across the world taking action against corruption as being the most critical game changer in bringing about sustainable change in fighting corruption. In that sense mobilising people is really very much in tune with what is happening in the world out there and what is the next major frontier to bring about fundamental change in the way that we fight corruption. Because fighting corruption is not only about effective ways to deal with corruption. It is also about social justice. That, I think is brought together very poignantly in mobilising people - to bring an end to corruption and bring greater social justice to the world. In that sense I think this conference and the time in which it takes place, as well as the way that it is structured is indeed very, very exciting.

IACC team: At the beginning of September we saw thousands of Brazilians take to the streets to peacefully protest against corruption. This is one of many similar events happening all over the globe. What do you think about this change in protest cultures?

Cobus de Swardt: I think if you look at protest and civil action against injustices and for human rights over the last decade, they have had very particular patterns of not happening in one location at a time: Whether you look at the fight against colonialism, whether you look at the fight against the cold war. Most of these were actions that were bottled-up frustrations against injustices. Not in one country or one city but across bigger areas and where the domino effect started it was in most cases an action that was unstoppable and irreversible. I think we have seen the same in the last couple of years where the demand for public accountability and an end to corruption became something that really was a major driver for change. It is the key driver, in my view, of the Arab spring. I think the events that we have seen in countries beyond the Arab speaking world are very much in that framework of citizens not only saying that they no longer want to live with corruption but that they also say that they want to have their leaders in all sectors to be held accountable for their actions. I think that those [protest movements] we have seen over the last 2 to 3 years take a variety of forms. They can be about food price increases, they can be about issues of access to medical care but ultimately they are about citizens saying they want a greater public accountability in all areas of live. That, I think, is very much also what we have seen in Brazil. It is a fantastic backdrop for us to plan to have the IACC in a country that is critical to that region, that is critical to the world, and of course we have also the eyes of the world focussed on it with the Olympics and the World Soccer Cup being there. So, for Brazil there is a lot to be gained to bring in best practices in terms of public accountability

IACC team: Looking at the future of the anti-corruption movement, what are the opportunities and how can the IACC help to address them?

Cobus de Swardt: I think the IACC has over the years created a very important platform for multi-stakeholder engagement - bringing civil society, business community and governments together. For any initiative to run for a long time one has to, from time to time, take a step back, pause, and think: Does it really still make a contribution? I think in this time when we have a particular awareness across the world that the existing institutional networks of global governance have really been unable to deal with global crises, the importance of multi-stakeholder consultations, multi-stakeholder involvement is more important than ever before. So in that sense the IACC has been, if you look back historically, ahead of its time. The challenge for the IACC now is whether it can work with these constituencies – bring them together and particularly be a vehicle where this quest for this increased public accountability can be part of how these multi-stakeholders interact. I think that will be a major challenge particularly because the existing institutions as they exist in civil society, in the public sector and the business community are by a large not fully engaged or integrated into broad social movements. And those are the ones that are increasingly bringing about fundamental social change across the world. So it is not only; can we bring these multi-stakeholders together in the IACC but can the IACC also since it brings these constituencies together also have a much greater involvement with broader social movements. Social movements that spring up and take on an issue and again dissolve. That only time will tell - whether the IACC can do that efficiently. But I think that it is for both, the IACC as well as the anti-corruption movement, the key challenge: To harness a new model of multi-stakeholder engagement. Particularly a model that will have on the one hand much greater demands on public accountability and on the other hand not formed part of the old structures of governance the way we have known it. That is a challenge for the IACC; that is a challenge for those fighting corruption and a challenge for all of those that look for both – better and as well more just global governance in the years to come.

You can listen to the interview here

 

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IACC Newsletter Interview with Minister Jorge Hage Sobrinho 09/21/11

Interview with the Head of the office of the Comptroller General in Brazil

IACC Newsletter interview – Minister Jorge Hage – head of the Office of the Comptroller General of Brazil – 2011

This month we spoke to Minister Jorge Hage Sobrinho, the Head of the Office of the Comptroller General of Brazil about the Open Government Partnership (OGP) that has been launched this month. The OGP is a multilateral initiative that aims to secure concrete commitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fight corruption, and harness new technologies to strengthen governance. In the spirit of multi-stakeholder collaboration, OGP is overseen by a steering committee of governments and civil society organizations. In its inaugural year the OGP is co-chaired by minister Hage and United States Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs Maria Otero…

IACC Newsletter interview – Minister Jorge Hage – head of the Office of the Comptroller General of Brazil – 2011

This month we spoke to Minister Jorge Hage Sobrinho, the Head of the Office of the Comptroller General of Brazil about the Open Government Partnership (OGP) that has been launched this month. The OGP is a multilateral initiative that aims to secure concrete commitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fight corruption, and harness new technologies to strengthen governance. In the spirit of multi-stakeholder collaboration, OGP is overseen by a steering committee of governments and civil society organizations. In its inaugural year the OGP is co-chaired by minister Hage and United States Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs Maria Otero.

In respect to the Open Government Partnership (OGP) which your government is co-chairing, where do you think Brazil is setting an example?

We have been working hard in Brazil to increase the transparency of public information and stimulate civic engagement.

In November 2004 the Brazilian Office of the Comptroller General created the Transparency Portal of the Federal Public Administration (http://www.transparencia.gov.br ) to provide free access to the federal budget data.

The Portal can be accessed by anyone without the need of a username or password. It is developed using user-friendly language, in less technical terms than those used in the accounting system.

The goal is to facilitate citizen oversight of the federal budget and it is worth noting that the use of the Transparency Portal by citizens, as a source of reliable information on the federal budget execution, has continuously increased.

The Portal is also constantly improved to better service Brazilian citizens. A great example of how we are constantly working to improve the Portal relies on the fact that since May 2010 data on budget execution and revenue collection of the central government is updated on a daily basis. In other words: every transaction completed every day is published and available for consultation on every following morning on the Portal.

I believe that is very unique and unprecedented, as very few other governments are able to publish their budget’s execution on a daily basis.

In your opinion, what’s the biggest corruption challenge in Brazil, and how do you think this challenge can be overcome?

We still have some challenges ahead of us in the fight against corruption. Some of our major challenges are: 1) the slowness of the judicial process and the continuing perception of impunity; 2) private financing of electoral campaigns and political parties; and 3) the resistance of the business community to the idea that corporate integrity can be good business.

Most of these challenges cannot be tackled by the government alone. It is critical to involve all interested actors, every stakeholder in the efforts to address such issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance that we include and engage every actor in the debate, that we create opportunities to raise awareness on these issues and for all stakeholders to contribute to the debate and to the crafting of solutions.

The stakeholders in question include the Congress, the Judiciary Branch and the business community.

How do you see the OGP country action plans supporting an effective implementation of the UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC)?

UNCAC, going beyond previous Conventions against Corruption, devotes an entire chapter to the prevention of corruption, holding obligations on issues like public procurement (establishment of transparent systems of procurement), management of public finances, transparency in the public administration, enhancing integrity and accountability in the private sector and participation of society in the prevention of and fight against corruption, just to name a few of them.

The five grand areas of challenge that OGP aims to address, in terms of creating safer communities, effectively managing public resources, ensuring public integrity, delivering services more efficiently and promoting corporate responsibility, are clearly very closely linked to the obligations under the UNCAC.

Since the beginning, our idea in the OGP Steering Committee has always been to create synergies with existing initiatives in the key areas of open government. Overlapping initiatives and duplication of efforts do not help any countries in the fight against corruption. So, OGP, while asking countries to stretch beyond current practice in open government, aims to also complement, to work together with existing initiatives, especially one like the UNCAC that congregates more than 100 countries.

OGP country action plans are elaborated by each country based on the country’s unique circumstances, needs, goals and objectives and, since every OGP Steering Committee country is a State Party to the UNCAC, we can only expect that OGP country commitments will strengthen and assist countries in their efforts to implement obligations under the UNCAC.

Since the OGP is a multi-stakeholder approach, where do you see the biggest challenges in terms of civil society participation, and how would you recommend to overcome these challenges?

The OGP is a multi-stakeholder approach to governance challenges countries have been facing for decades by themselves. However, every participating country agrees that there is no “one solution fits all” for these challenges. We can help each other by sharing experiences, sharing successes and lessons learned in the roads we have travelled on trying to tackle these challenges, but we cannot tell each what the best way to go is. Our goal in OGP is to foster change by our examples, by our strong commitment to engaging society in the crafting of solutions for the governance problems we face every day. That is why we are creating a voluntary partnership and a non-binding Declaration of Principles.

Hosting the 15th IACC will bring the global anti-corruption community to Brazil in November 2012. What specifically would you like the OGP to have achieved by then, and how would the 15th IACC participants provide input into the OGP process?

By September 2012, we will have celebrated OGP’s first official year of existence and the first year of implementation of the commitments announced by the Steering Committee countries.

Furthermore, we will have already welcomed to the Partnership new participating countries, the ones set to announce their commitments in March 2012 in Brazil.

So, we hope that when we meet in Brasilia for the 15th IACC in November 2012, OGP will have established and consolidated itself as a vehicle for countries, through their country action plans, to involve the public sector, citizens and civil society organizations in initiatives that will improve and strengthen the management of public resources, the delivery of services, civic participation, corruption combating and prevention, transparency, public and private accountability as well as the access to public information.
We believe the 15th IACC in Brazil will provide a great opportunity to further the debates and exchange of experiences on how to address the cross-cutting issues featured in both the Conference’s and the OGP’s agenda; issues like how to energize civil society and foster civic participation in the fight against corruption; how to take advantage of new technologies, platforms and tools to provide access to public information, increase transparency of public data, improve the management of public funds and provide better services to the population; as well as many other issues.

As I mentioned before, the goal of the OGP is also to create synergies, to collaborate with existing initiatives and avoid duplication of efforts. This is very much in line with the IACC Series goals. So, to benefit the global movement, we have the unique opportunity to create a strong synergy between the OGP and the IACC Series starting in 2012 in Brazil.

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IACC Theme: Focusing on People 09/21/11

Read our blog entry on the new theme here

Save the date in your diary: The 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference is taking place 7 – 10 November 2012 in Brasilia, Brazil and we are very excited to announce that the theme of the conference is “Mobilising people: Connecting Agents of Change”. Since 1983, the conference series has served as the leading international platform for those who want to put an end to corruption and eliminate the negative impacts it has on the economy, the environment, democracy and most importantly people’s everyday lives.

Save the date in your diary: The 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference is taking place 7 – 10 November 2012 in Brasilia, Brazil and we are very excited to announce that the theme of the conference is “Mobilising people: Connecting Agents of Change”. Since 1983, the conference series has served as the leading international platform for those who want to put an end to corruption and eliminate the negative impacts it has on the economy, the environment, democracy and most importantly people’s everyday lives.

People across the globe are demanding fair and democratic systems where they get a say in how their country is governed.  This has been proven by the wave of demonstrations and protests in the Middle East and North Africa. The joint forces and voices of many resulted in the overthrow of two head of states. Just recently and still ongoing in this context are the events taking place in Brazil, where thousands of people peacefully protested against corruption on the country’s Independence Day. However, besides releasing undemocratic and corrupt leaders, politicians and officials from their positions of power change is needed in those countries’ governance and power structures. All this points to a need to restore people’s trust by ensuring accountability of leaders and officials and to prevent repetition in the future.

Now more then ever the combination of engaged societies and national and international justice systems that hold people accountable for their actions need to be embraced. The 15th IACC will be the platform to explore these issues and come up with innovative solutions with one thing being clear: This time the focus will be on people. Giving agency and listen to those who are ready to create change, encouraging those who have innovative ideas, and supporting those who are willing to speak up. People can and will create change – the 15th IACC will support all those who are willing to change the rules of the game.

Participants from the public, private and civil society sectors will gather in Brasilia to reshape the international agenda by creating collaborative strategies and advocacy on a national and global scale. Held every two years in a different region of the world, with up to 1500 participants from over 135 countries, the IACC is a great opportunity to collaborate with influential people and participants from other sectors for effective action against corruption.

For more information, regular updates and details on the ways you can get involved with the 15th IACC, whatever your area of interest or expertise; visit the 15th IACC website here: www.15iacc.org

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Tackling Corruption in Brasília 09/21/11

-The 15th IACC will be held from 7-10 November 2012 in Brasília, Brazil

15th IACC

Brasília is the seat of all three branches of the Brazilian government and works as a venue for political events, music performances and movie festivals. Brasília is a cosmopolitan city, with around 119 embassies, a wide range of restaurants and well-designed infrastructure. You can visit innovative buildings and imaginative monuments, ranging from the hyperboloid Cathedral of Brasilia to the lunar-esque Complexo Cultural da Republica to the glass-box Palacio da Alvorada ...

Brasilia

History

The plan for a new, planned central capital of Brazil was first conceived in 1827 by José Bonifacio, an advisor to Emperor Pedro I but it was not until 1956 that construction began on Brasilia; the embodiment of urban planning. Built in just four years between 1956 and 1960 under the leadership of President Juscelino Kubitsche, the plane-shaped city is made up of well defined sectors; residential, hotel, commercial and embassy. In 1987, Brasilia was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is the only city built in the 20th Century to receive this mark of distinction due to its unique design and fantastic architecture. The original plan of the city was to accommodate 500,000 people, mostly government workers but now the city has over 2 million inhabitants. Many of the migrant workers who came to help build the city ended up staying, and these communities now form the basis of Brasilia’s many “satellite cities.” Brasilia’s history is one of the things that makes this city unique. Brasilia is a model to future city builders about what can be done with determination, skill and urban planning.

Brasilia Now

Brasília is the seat of all three branches of the Brazilian government and works as a venue for political events, music performances and movie festivals. Brasília is a cosmopolitan city, with around 119 embassies, a wide range of restaurants and well-designed infrastructure. You can visit innovative buildings and imaginative monuments, ranging from the hyperboloid Cathedral of Brasilia to the lunar-esque Complexo Cultural da Republica to the glass-box Palacio da Alvorada.

Weather

The climate in Brasilia Brazil is mild and comfortable any time of year. The 15th IACC will be taking place in November when the average temperature is 22˚C

Travel

By bus

Most local buses start from or go through the rodoviária, at the precise center of the city, and run along the “wings” - serving the residential zones - or through the Monumental Axis. Red-and-white minibuses, called Zebrinha (little zebras) or Transporte de Vizinhança are very useful for moving around, as they link the central area of Brasilia (Setor Comercial, Setor de Diversões etc.) to Esplanada dos Ministérios, the airport and some of the main avenues (L2 and W3).
Buses must be flagged; otherwise they will only stop when a passenger requests to hop off. Single fares are R$ 2.00 for travel within Brasília. There is no advance sale of tickets, pay as you board.

By taxi

Taxis are relatively expensive in Brasilia and usually cannot be hailed on the streets. Taxi stands, however, are close to all tourist attractions and any hotel will be able to call a cab or provide the phone number of the best known dispatch offices. All taxis must have taximeters and can start charging only after the passenger has boarded.

By subway

The Metrô subway system started operating in 2001. Its Y-shaped line starts in the main bus station (Rodoviária de Brasília - “Central” station) and makes its first stop at Setor Comercial Sul (“Galeria” station), which is fairly near some hotels South of Monumental Axis. It runs along the south wing, stopping at blocks 102, 108, 112 and 114, then going through suburbs. The subway uses to operate 6 AM to 11:30 PM from Monday to Friday (some stations stop selling tickets at 10:30 PM), and from 7 AM to 7 PM on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. It is common to be offered special timelines on some holidays, like New Year’s Eve and the April 21st (city’s anniversary). It’s not particularly useful for tourists, as it does not attend the main attractions, but you may check Around Brasilia by subway, for a proposed itinerary that includes attractions such as the Buddhist Temple (EQS 115/116, access by “114 Sul” Station); Parkshopping mall (next to “Shopping” station) and a typical fair in the satellite city of Guará (access by “Feira” Station). Single fare: R$ 3,00, R$ 2,00 on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

Safety

In Brasilia crime has recently been on the rise. Tourists should practice caution and common sense while travelling in Brasilia. Pickpockets tend to target places where tourists congregate, so be cautious when going to historic sites, museums, restaurants, or when taking public transportation. Avoid walking alone in isolated areas, especially after dark.

Culture

Tipping in Brazil is typically not expected nor given. Obviously, if someone provides a typically good or special service, you might consider a bit extra.

At almost all restaurants and bars, a standard “Serviço” service fee of 10% is included as a line item at the end of the “conta” or bill.  It is not expected to surpass this amount. It is always clearly identified this fee is not obligatory, but it is hardly expected you pay it.

At bars, the bartenders do not handle cash. In a bar or a restaurant, you ask the bartender for your bill, and he brings a total (usually with full details). Communication is often informal and does not rely on strict rules of protocol.

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Getting Ready for the 15th IACC 06/15/11

The IACC is coming to Brazil in November 2012

During the Closing Plenary at the 14th IACC in Thailand, it was announced by Minister Jorge Hage Sobrinho that the conference in 2012 is to be held in Brazil.
Since then, everyone involved has been gearing up to make sure the 15th IACC is effective and exciting…

During the Closing Plenary at the 14th IACC in Thailand, it was announced by Minister Jorge Hage Sobrinho that the conference in 2012 is to be held in Brazil.
Since then, everyone involved has been gearing up to make sure the 15th IACC is effective and exciting.
The 15th IACC is coming to Brazil in November 2012 and the IACC team is working with the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG), AMARRIBO, the Ethos Institute and Transparency International to put together a conference that will connect the global anti-corrurption community and tackle the problems corruption causes.
The theme of the conference is being developed right now and we’re developing lots of different ways for everyone to get involved.
There will be many opportunities over the coming months to get involved with the 15th IACC. Right now, you can tell us what you would like to see on the agenda by emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). If you are interested in participating in a workshop, you can start thinking about your workshop proposal now, in time for workshop propsal submission which will open around February 2012.
You can also keep an eye on our Facebook page and blog for the latest updates on ways to get involved, including news on competitions, opportunities to hook up with other young journalists and to stay plugged in to corruption in the news.
Registration will open approximately in February 2012. That’s about 8 months before the conference so you will have plenty of time to plan your trip.
We look forward to seeing you in Brazil!

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Read me 02/09/11

News

Info, Theme

We just opened the call for session proposals for 15IACC! Find out more here

We just opened the call for session proposals for 15IACC! Find out more here

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14th IACC Speakers 03/16/10

More celebrated speakers confirm

Collective Action, Speaker, Participation

The speakers list for the 14th IACC is becoming each week more impressive. Recently confirmed speakers include Patrick Alley, Paul Collier, John Githongo, Karen Lissakers and Kunio Mikuriya….

The speakers list for the 14th IACC is becoming each week more impressive. Recently confirmed speakers include Patrick Alley, Paul Collier, John Githongo, Karen Lissakers and Kunio Mikuriya. Alley is the cofounder and director of Global Witness, a leading NGO that focuses on preventing conflict and corruption arising from the use of natural resources. Professor Collier is a world famous author and economist, best known for his 2007 best selling book The Bottom Billion. Githongo is a lauded whistleblower and former head of Kenya’s anti-corruption commission, while Lissakers directs the Revenue Watch Institute in Washington DC and Mikuriya is the Secretary General of the World Customs Organization. These speakers have done far more though than what fits in these few lines, so be sure to check out their photos and bios on the 14th IACC Speakers page!

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Call for Workshop Proposals Closed 02/11/10

Ideas, Inspiration, Innovation

Participation, Workshops

Thank you to all who have submitted proposals for the 14th IACC. We currently are taking time to review the proposals, our analysis to date indicates we received an interesting variety of topics from all around the world, stay turned for more details! IACC workshops aim to stimulate debate, forge solutions and identify tangible, effective and innovative strategies to combat corruption and boost transparency and accountability standards.

A fundamental feature of each IACC is the eclectic mix of up to 50 workshops and special sessions that take place during the 4 days of the conference. 14th IACC workshops will tackle the following global challenges:

Restoring Trust for Peace & Security

Fuelling Rransparency & Accountability in the Natural Resources & Energy Markets

Climate Governance: Ensuring a Collective Commitment

Strengthening Global Action for an Accountable Corporate World

IACC workshops aim to stimulate debate, forge solutions and identify tangible, effective and innovative strategies to combat corruption and boost transparency and accountability standards.
The call for workshop proposals was open until 31 March 2010. Write to us or visit http://www.14iacc.org for more info!

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Restoring trust: Global action for transparency 06/09/09

10 - 13 November, Bangkok 2010

14th IACC, Bangkok, Theme

The theme of the 14th IACC has been announced. Under the title “Restoring trust: Global action for transparency”, royalty, heads of state, civil society and the private sector will meet in 2010 to tackle the increasingly sophisticated challenges posed by corruption. On a global scale, our fates are intimately linked. Be part of the solution, join us in Bangkok!

With the first decade of the new millennium drawing to a close, transparency now has a place on global, regional and national agendas. It has become fashionable for political candidates to campaign on anti-corruption and good governance platforms. International agreements have been ratified and international firms progressively adopt compliance and oversight programmes. Yet trust in institutions on which our future depends has eroded.

In the aftermath of the financial crisis, the challenges threatening the livelihood of populations across the world have increased while hope for greater social justice has faded: Efforts to reduce poverty and to deliver on promises for sustainable development, human security, curbing illicit trade and climate control have not yet resulted in positive change.

Around the world, headlines showcase the continued impunity and the rise in organised crime and illicit financial flows. When trust in governance is questioned and confidence in institutions is hollow, apathy and insecurity flourish, creating an environment ripe for corruption.

This apathy must be combated with a compelling sense of urgency to address challenges head on. Many of the right promises have been made – the task at hand is to ensure that commitments are honoured. To restore peoples’ trust and rebuild the credibility of institutions, governments must move beyond expressions of political will to concrete action; the private sector must put a check on bribery and fulfil their obligations as corporate citizens and civil society must demand accountability. Above all, there is an urgent need for all actors to work together towards a transparent and accountable global governance agenda.

Be part of the solution. Join leading experts from civil society, the public, and private sectors at the 14th International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) from November 10 to 13, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. At the 14th IACC the global community will produce the strategies and recommendations to reset the global governance agenda for a sustainable future.

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Who will host the next IACC? 11/02/08

By President of the NACC, Mr. Panthep Klanarongran

14th IACC, Bangkok, NACC

imageSpeech delivered by President of the National Anti-Corruption Commission of Thailand, Mr. Panthep Klanarongran formally commiting to host the next IACC in 2010. “These past four days have been truly amazing…“Khop Khun Mak” which means thank you all very much. I look forward to seeing you in Thailand”

imageHon. Justice Barry O’Keefe, Madame Labelle, Dr Marschall, Distinguished Delegates, Ladies and gentlemen, it is a great honour for me to have this opportunity to say just a few words to you this afternoon, at the closing of the 13th IACC in Athens.

These past four days have been truly amazing. I am sure you will all agree that listening to the view of so many experts in the field and talking to anti-corruption officials from around the world, and sharing past successes, even failures, as well as future plans and hopes with so many old acquaintances and new-found friends, has been an unforgettable and energising experience. Congratulations to our hosts for a truly successful conference.

The National Anti-Corruption Commission of Thailand, the NACC, has been selected to host the 14th IACC in 2010. Since it was founded nine years ago, as a truly independent agency, to prevent and suppress corruption, the NACC has striven to increase its activities in the domestic and international arena.

The fact that it will host the IACC in 2010 is a sure sign of its success and standing in the field of anti-corruption. In fact, 2010 will be a truly important year for Thailand, as His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, who in his economic philosophy propounded the need for social justice and transparency, will become the longest reigning monarch.

There will be much rejoicing throughout the country, as the people celebrate His Majesty’s long life and remarkable achievements, and Thailand will be proud to welcome the world to join in these celebrations.

Honourable Justice O’Keefe, on behalf of the NACC, I hereby accept your invitation to host the 14th IACC in 2010. I do so with gratitude for the special opportunity that has been given to the NACC and to Thailand, and I do so with humility, aware of the enormous responsibility that is involved. And I do so with quiet confidence that, with the assistance of my colleagues at the NACC, Transparency International, TI Thailand and all of you, the 14th IACC will become a conference to remember.

Distinguished delegates, ladies and gentlemen, I look forward to welcoming you all to Bangkok in 2010. “Khop Khun Mak”, which means thank you all very much. I look forward to seeing you in two years time in Thailand.

Thank you for your attention. 

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Interview with Mary Robinson 10/31/08

Human Rights and Corruption

Global Compact, Human Rights, The Elders

image2008 is the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. As former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights do you view corruption as a threat to this vision? “The Elders has a mission to “support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict, and inspire hope where there is despair…”

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2008 is the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. As former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights do you view corruption as a threat to this vision?

Very much so. I was very keen to ensure that we made good links during this year with the many chapters of Transparency International that are tackling corruption and the human rights people on the ground who are addressing the violations of human rights. There is a real overlap. When we launched the Elders campaign Every Human Has Rights, which is on the website http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org, Cobus de Swardt [Managing Director of Transparency International] came to Cape Town for it. Huguette Labelle [Chair of Transparency International] and I are members of the board of the Global Compact and we had said that this was the year to encourage more linking between human rights and corruption because corruption links to huge violations of human rights.

The Elders has a mission to “support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict, and inspire hope where there is despair”, does corruption represent a hurdle to this and do you have any plans to tackle it?

I think we would see it as being implicit in our approach of being humble. That is how Nelson Mandela wonderfully instructed us at our planning meeting. He said to be humble and reach out and listen to those who feel invisible, that feel isolated, that feel voiceless in society and who are victims of corruption. These are the people who need to have a voice and be understood. These very people who suffer from corruption, whether it is corruption in the health service, corruption in the police, or corruption in governments of rich countries with large poor populations because the resources are being siphoned away. So I feel we have a very strong encouragement to speak out against corruption and the Elders intend to be good strong moral voices on all of these issues.

There is a school of thought that globalisation equals unscrupulous multi-national corporations for whom the bottom line is the only guiding principle. To what extent is this the case? Do you think that the growing awareness of corporate social responsibility and the birth of such voluntary initiatives as the UN Global Compact are making corporations see what role they can play in driving positive change?

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I’m slow to characterise globalisation as being necessarily negative. At the moment, when we talk about globalisation we are talking about economic globalisation by and large and that is weighted in favour of the rich countries. But there are opportunities in the context of globalisation. On 16 October this year, 116.9 million people stood up in a 24 hour period against poverty. That is a huge mobilisation and if we can build on that strength, it’s the strength of numbers.

I think the Global Compact provides a framework that is quite weak in its standards, but we have ways of strengthening it. The board of the Global Compact has decided to have committees. I chair the Human Rights Working Group, Huguette Labelle chairs the Anti-corruption Working Group, and there is now a labour one that we’ve formed. That provides the beginnings of bringing good practices into a voluntary arrangement, which is what the Global Compact is.

I am interested in how we can have the mandates of John Ruggie become, over the next three years, an operational mandate on the duty of states to protect their people from violations by what we call non-state actors, which includes business. It is more than just “do no harm”, you must find out what is the impact of your business, are you in violations of human rights? If you are bribing in poor countries and getting away with it, you are not respecting human rights.

Interview by Michael Sidwell, Transparency International

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